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Research Shows that Babies Learn to Talk by Lip Reading

Toegevoegd: 22 February 2012
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Recent research on speech development in infancy, published by the Florida Atlantic University, has show that babies essentially become lip readers when they are first beginning to produce basic speech-like sounds, as from about 6 months they shift attention to the mouth of whoever is talking.

In order to imitate you, a baby has to work out how to shape their lips to make a particular sound, hence why they look so intently at your mouth. Amazingly it doesn’t appear to take too long for them to work out which movements make which sounds, and by 12 months they start to shift their gaze back to your eyes again.

This confirms that the more quality time you spend face to face with your child during their first year the quicker they should learn to talk.

Here at iCandy we understand the importance of engaging and interacting with your child, so we have designed all of our pushchairs with parent/rear-ward facing options. So the next time you go for a stroll, make sure you smile, talk and laugh with your baby!

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